title: Control Automation by Yusef Audeh

type: sound design for C-Print I Single Channel Video, 45:00 min

year: 2016

description:

Control/Automation is a brief investigation into everyday technologies—parking meters, electronic barriers, microprocessors, autopilot systems—which regulate our behavior for greater safety and order. What drives our desire to encapsulate human knowledge into—and even give away decision-making capabilities to—hardware and software? This short film visualizes and reveals the imperceptible traces of Gilles Deleuze’s Control Society, asking whether political agency has diminished with our newfound dependence on automated systems.

watch it here

 
 
 
 

title: Planes by Janne Höltermann

type: sound design for C-Print I Single Channel Video, 45:00 min

year: 2016

description:

Planes compresses the flight trajectories of all incoming and outgoing planes of an airport in one day. In post-production the individual frames are overlaid to condense time and visualize the linear motion traces of the programmed landing and taking-off of aircraft.
The photograph displays all flight traffic occurring in one day.
The video follows the dramaturgy of the day which is defined by the changing wind directions and flight trajectories, as well as major traffic time-based patterns.

watch a segment here

watch a segment here

 
 
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title: building systems: investigating the subbasements of MIT

type: composition

instructor: Ernst Karel

year: 2015

description:

Building Systems is a composition completed for the Sonic Ethnography course with the SEL at Harvard.

Modern life has been dominated by the relentless progress of science which has provided new ways of understanding, solving problems, and relating to the world. Art, architecture, agriculture, medicine, information, transportation, and communication have all been transformed by the new advancements creating a scientific filter evocative of early Futurist ideas. Since its earliest days, MIT has held a pivotal role in this process. The incessant drive towards progress brought about by the advent of devices and machines in everyday life is reflected in the high-powered community of its students, faculty, and especially its architecture. Amid the many technological advancements, it’s easy to forget that these accomplishments do not exist independently from the facilities and systems that enable these buildings to operate. The energy necessary to support such efforts is also made possible by hard-working custodians often operating behind the scenes.

With this project, sound recording has been used to learn about my immediate environment. From early on in the semester, MIT was used as a site to explore the different sonic qualities around campus. Being a new student, I was struck with the sonorous nature of the campus, with its many facilities and building systems supporting the incessant drive of research and productivity. Deep whirs fill the air from exhaust fans on the tops of buildings. Upon entering, lobbies and corridors are alive with incredible activity and movement. The tone of each room is apparent with the whiz of fluorescent lights, and various beeping tones emit from sensors that fill the air. One constantly conducts a life embedded in a soundtrack of incessant background noise emitting from air conditioners, compressors, transformers, electric motors, and water pumps. An electric generating room sits at the top floor of a stairwell allowing the railings below to resonate at particular frequencies. Pipes squeal and steam is released behind thick doors labeled with warnings that ear protect is required. These building systems run throughout the whole campus and are connected by underground tunnels and subbasements. This extensive underground network of tunnels provides many more opportunities to connect to the institution's rich history and learn about the intricate fabric of energy systems that support such scientific progress.

What became clear when exploring these spaces is the relationship between occupied and unoccupied spaces. Occupied spaces are commonly referred to as a place for human activities, where unoccupied spaces are areas that are noted as being inactive. Typically unoccupied spaces are only occupied occasionally and briefly for maintenance and repairs. This interplay of the design and maintenance of buildings is commonly refereed to as building science, which draws upon life sciences, physics, chemistry, architecture and engineering. Understanding the physical behavior of the building as a system and how this impacts human activity, energy efficiency, durability, comfort and air quality is elemental in the operation of high-performance environments. This project aims to promote a certain consciousness of our architectural experience and its intimate dependence on the systems of energy that enable our modern architectural experience to exist. Through recording and composition, it’s in this spirit that I work with building systems.