alvin lucier

Jacob Kirkegaard's Labyrinthitis

Released in 2008 by Touch, the composition by Jacob Kirkegaard builds on ideas from Duchamp, Cage, and Lucier. It may even be a nod to the early pyschoacoustic work of Maryanne Amacher

With Labyrinthitis, Kirkegaard used otoacoustic emissions recorded with tiny speakers and microphones to capture the sounds generated by his inner ear.  He then amplified these tones, and created a site-specific installation which produced otoacoustic emissions in the ears of the listeners.

These high frequency tones were looped and played through a series of speakers resembling the structure of the inner ear. The 16 speakers were attached to metal rods of varying lengths to create an ascending spiral hanging from a dome ceiling. The piece was first performed at the Medical Museum in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

More info on the project with an in depth look at the project by Douglas Kahn here.

Also, a great review of the project by Manuel Arturo Abreu here.

music for solo performer

Alvin Lucier, Music for Solo Performer in which performer’s brain waves are amplified and used to generate sounds from a variety of objects including gongs, wine glasses, drums, and cans.

musicforsoloperformer

Alvin Lucier, Music for Solo Performer in which performer’s brain waves are amplified and used to generate sounds from a variety of objects including gongs, wine glasses, drums, and cans.

Alvin Lucier's I Am Sitting In A Room

Alvin Lucier's 1969 composition is among the best known minimal tape pieces. This work explores the relationship between sound and space through a process of spoken word and recording, re-recording, and re-re-recording. The acoustical properties of the space transform the speech until natural resonances create a tonal harmony with an additive droning, ambient quality. Alvin Lucier is a pioneer who realized that architectural space is not merely a setting for traditional musical experiences but that it could be used an instrument itself. His sizable body of experimental works and sound installations explore this concept.

Ubu provides the original 1969 tape recording along with a few of his other works. In an interview with Lucier, he explained how he had to record late at night and unplug the refrigerator to minimize unwanted noise. Below is the 1981 recording. More on Lucier at Lovely Music.